SpaceX launch canceled with new takeoff scheduled for Saturday

[ad_1]

The launch of SpaceX does not take place today, the weather delaying the live broadcast of takeoff until Saturday May 30 at 3:22 p.m. EDT. We will bring the SpaceX live stream here.

The SpaceX launch on Wednesday was officially cleaned up 17 minutes inside the launch window, with NASA suspended until the last few minutes to save today's efforts. Time had other plans.

NASA has strict weather rules for the clearance of spacecraft launches and noted that three weather conditions have been reported, including “natural lightning.” If they could have waited ten minutes after the countdown, they could have erased the violations, according to officials from SpaceX and NASA.

What is interesting is that it was what is called an “ instant launch ”, i.e. due to the orbital mechanics, a delay was not possible if the crew wanted to arrive on time at the International Space Station (ISS) and lock in precisely.

The good news is that everything that was technical with the craft and the crew was kicked off for Wednesday, so as long as this weekend's weather co-operates, the mission will take place on Saturday. The weather was the only concern, according to NASA.

It is the birth of commercially supported human space travel.

This week’s delayed SpaceX Demo-2 mission remains historic as it takes place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. This is the first launch of its kind on American soil in nearly a decade – since NASA removed the space shuttle in 2011. It is also the first time that a reusable SpaceX spacecraft has sent astronauts from NASA in space. It is the birth of commercially supported human space travel.

The destination of this SpaceX launch is the International Space Station (ISS) for a period of one to four months for NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken, according to our friends Space.com.

Of course you have other questions. What time does SpaceX live streaming start in your area of ​​the world on Saturday now that it has been canceled for today? What happened that you missed (and that will probably happen again on Saturday)? Who are the lucky astronauts? We have all of this information below.

Here's how to watch what's left of the SpaceX launch live stream:

SpaceX launch weather worries about takeoff

Even with all the exceptional planning before this SpaceX launch, NASA and Elon Musk can't control the weather (not yet anyway). Florida, although normally sunny, has frequent rapid rain showers, and this seems to be the case for the crew here.

The live stream of the SpaceX launch has been constantly discussed by operators discussing the rain conditions. They waited a few minutes before the countdown expired to clean up the mission, hoping to finish it. Saturday May 30 will be the next launch date for the SpaceX launch.

Another meteorological variable is the fact that the weather conditions must be good all over what spaceship could be. For example, if the crew were to abort anywhere along their ascent and descend, the recovery teams would have to access the capsule, so it is more than the immediate Florida launch pad that needs ideal weather.

SpaceX launch time broadcast live

(Image credit: NASA)

SpaceX launch scheduled for Saturday

The official launch time for Demo-2 SpaceX is Saturday, May 30 at 3:22 p.m. EDT, so times across the Americas will be 2:22 p.m. CDT / 1:22 p.m. MDT / 12:22 p.m. PDT. You may want to show up a few minutes in advance to pick up the rocket while it is on the ground and steam is escaping.

The UK SpaceX launch time will be 20:22 BST. In addition to tuning in to the live video stream, you should go out and see if you can spot the SpaceX-built spacecraft in the sky around 8:40 p.m. BST – if that remains true on Saturday (this was the case for Wednesday's launch at least ).

In Australia, it will already be Sunday, the launch time taking place at 5:22 AM ACT.

SpaceX launch time broadcast live

(Image credit: NASA)

How to watch SpaceX launch on Saturday

Official NASA and SpaceX YouTube accounts will offer live streaming of the preparations, which they say will look like you've already seen it if you signed in for the launch on Wednesday.

Don't worry, you don't have to tune in to both – they offer the same content on both live streams

During the launch on Wednesday, we saw the founder of SpaceX, Elon Musk, visit the astronauts equipped Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken and exchange a few words before takeoff. Musk then went to greet US Vice President Mike Pence, who is there to attend the launch. President Donald Trump joined shortly after, while Hurley and Behnken went to the launch site in a Tesla Model X (Tesla being another company founded by Musk).

NASA continued to monitor the weather via data sensors around the launch site to keep everything “green” on their maps. At the time, NASA said that “time is going in the right direction,” but as the countdown to T-minus 17 minutes passed, the favor went the other way.

This meant that the crew was seated in the capsule after crossing the crew's access arm and that the crew's arm had already retracted. The vapor began to detach from the rocket before the launch was canceled. It was so close to takeoff.

SpaceX spaceship, SpaceX suits and NASA astronauts

On Saturday, astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken will return inside the Dragon capsule, which sits atop the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. It is located on a launch pad at the legendary 39A launch complex at Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral in Florida. The LC-39A was originally built for the Apollo missions and redesigned for the space shuttle program.

Hurley (the commander of the spacecraft) and Behnken (the commander of joint operations) are astronauts, engineers and the two former members of the American army of NASA (Hurley is a former sailor, while Behnken was in the US Air Force).

The crew of two NASA men not only flies in a spaceship built by SpaceX, but is also equipped with SpaceX pressurized suits, presented for the first time in 2017.



[ad_2]

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments